Learn skills like 'A Chorus Line's' cast

Suzanna Dupree as Sheila from "A Chorus Line,"

Suzanna Dupree as Sheila from "A Chorus Line," which is presenting two performances on Mar. 1 and Mar. 2, 2013 at the Tilles Center for the Performing Arts. (Credit: Phil Martin)

When people think of Broadway, the image of dancers in gold costumes and sparkly top hats kicking in unison instantly comes to mind. This scene stems from, "One," the legendary closing number of "A Chorus Line," the 1975 musical that not only won a Pulitzer Prize but nine Tony Awards. Friday and Saturday that "singular sensation" comes to the LIU Tilles Center in Brookville.

"The show is just iconic and groundbreaking, therefore it's endeared," says Jeremiah Ginn, who plays the hard-driven director, Zach. "It really paved the way for Broadway today. Every show after 'A Chorus Line' was different. Without it, who knows what the theater scene would be like now."

Want to pursue your own dreams to be a triple threat? Here are three places that can teach you how to be part of a chorus line. (Prices vary.)

 

LEARN TO DANCE

If you think you can dance, Variations -- A Dancer's Studio in Huntington offers adult classes in jazz, ballet, tap, hip-hop, flamenco and contemporary. Classes run six days a week in the morning and evening, for both men and women, whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced dancer.

"Dance is exercise for the mind, body and soul," says Erin Lopez, artistic director. "Our adults want to be here because they chose to do this. They are looking to have fun."

Performance opportunities include being part of an annual showcase or special events like the upcoming flash mob to be held next month at Old Navy in Huntington.

INFO 180 Spring Rd., Huntington, 631- 425-9220, variationsdancestudio.com

 

LEARN TO ACT

The Gateway Playhouse in Bellport can help you tap into your inner thespian with its adult acting and improvisational class. The eight-week program consists of two-hour sessions every Monday night.

"Many people are looking for an outlet of creative expression to make their days a little bit more active and enjoyable," says Robin Joy Allan, director of the acting school. "Some people do it just to see if they can. They really come out with a sense of accomplishment."

Each class, which holds 15 people, starts with 30 minutes of acting techniques followed by improv exercises and an hour of monologue work. All levels of talent are welcome.

"People learn that what happens on stage has to be a representation of life. They can live within these improvs and scenes practicing their life skills," says Allan. "You learn how to listen and communicate better. They discover different aspects of themselves they had no idea would come out."

INFO 215 South Country Rd., Bellport, 631-286-1133, gatewayplayhouse.com

 

LEARN TO SING AND ACT

Combine singing and acting at the John W. Engeman Theater's "That's Entertainment" class in Northport, which is open to all adults.

"We have people who have never opened their mouth to sing mixed with some who have been doing it for 20 years and want to brush up on their skills," says Jennifer Collester Tully, artistic administrator. "The program is wonderful for building confidence. We provide them with a real theater experience."

Over 12 weeks, students work on ensemble pieces as well as solo spotlights. An acting coach and musical director will help you choose material best suited to your voice and character. The semester concludes with an onstage performance for family and friends.

INFO 250 Main St., Northport, 631-261-2900, engemantheater.com

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